FILM & VIDEO PRODUCTION GLOSSARY

# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
There are currently 32 names in this directory beginning with the letter F.
Fade
Used in every type of film production including corporate videos, a fade is the ‘fading in’ or ‘fading out’ slowly of a clip, at the beginning or end of a movie it is generally from black (or any colour) or to black (or any colour). During a corporate video a clip may be faded (or cross faded) to another gently, giving a smooth transition (Video editing)

FAST
Very simply, when a camera assistant is used in feature film or corporate video production, the term FAST means Focus; Aperture; Shutter; Tachometer – this is the domain of the camera assistant to check and adjust accordingly. (Crew)

Fast & slow lenses
The relative speed of a lens is a measure of the lens’ maximum aperture. The faster the lens, the more light crosses from outside the camera to behind the lens. Aperture is denoted as F Stop numbers, the lower the number, the quicker or ‘faster’ the lens (Crew).

FAY
A FAY is a 650W balanced daylight lamp (Lighting)

Feed Lines
Talent can be given off-screen or verbal cues to remind them of what their lines are .(Talent)

Fill Light
In video production, fill or a fill light is placed on the opposite side to the key (main) light. Fill light can be used to reduce contrast or simply fill areas where the light needs to be enhanced. (Lighting)

Film Production
Films and corporate video are produced by producers. The process of film production outlines the entire realm of services from initial scoping and project management, through to end-distribution. It includes the management of all video production services in between such as filming, scripting, and post production. (Production)

Film Production Company
A company (such as a film company or a corporate video production company) which provides video services or film services to clients for a range of productions. (Production)

Fingers
The tiny flags used in video production and film-making are called ‘Fingers’ in the video industry. (Lighting)

Fixer
A fixer is either a company or generally an individual who has extensive contacts within a particular country. For example if you are filming in a remote location or a country which has cultural or language differences, a fixer will have all the contacts to enable video productions to be completed without the need to visit the country to pre-arrange talent, locations, hire equipment, permissions etc. In corporate video production, a company for example in Manchester or London may wish to employ the services of an Australian fixer or a fixer from South Africa, if the company doesn’t have an office in the region itself. (Production)

Flag
In corporate video production companies a flag is a piece of dark material used to restrict light from being in the frame (Lighting / Grip).

Flat
This refers to either a set-design construction wall or a fixed-price fee, used by corporate video producers in Manchester or London video production companies. (Set design / Finance)

Flood
A type of light which has a very wide angle spread of beam is called a flood. They are different than spot lights or other forms of controlled lighting. (Lighting)

Flux
Light within an filming environment is measured in Flux or lumens. (Lighting)

Fly on the Wall
A style of video production, which can be reality TV, reality corporate video production or documentary-style, which gives a warts-and-all view of what is supposed to be reality. A good video production company London-based, such as thinktank can deliver results for corporate video fly-on-the-wall documentary or corporate video productions. They have become increasingly popular over the past decade in the UK. (Production / broadcast TV)

Foamcore
A plastic layer (foam /polystyrene) contained between paper-backed surfaces. Propriety examples include Foamex which can be used to deflect or reflect light sources. For more hardy materials, Forex, which is a more plasticated version of Foamcore can be used. This withstands more heavy duty use. (Grip/Lighting)

Focal Length
The technical definition of focal length is different to what film crew usually mean. Film crew use focal length to determine how narrow, wide or telescopic a lens will be. Lenses with a fixed focal length (eg 35mm) are called prime lenses. The Director or DoP will select a lens of a given focal length for a particular scene. The technical definition involves the distance between the glass optical lens and the video camera sensor. (Crew)

Focal Point
The Focal Point is used by video production companies to indicate the actual point or area which is the main focus for the frame. (Crew).

Focus Pull
A focus pull is when a subject or object is brought into focus, from an out of focus start point. The pull adjusts the distance from the camera which is in focus and a focus pull is used for shooting using a shallow depth of field. If lights or reflections can be seen, the out of focus start point may contain beautifully shaped ‘bokeh’ which sometimes looks like circles of light or shapes of light which change into a fully focused sharp image when focus is pulled. (Crew)

Focus Puller
The member of the camera department who works on larger productions to pull focus is called a focus puller. Focus pullers can use a variety of devices to pull focus, using the follow focus if required, or focus may be pulled electronically for some setups. (Crew)

Focus wheel
The focus wheel is used to alter focus on a camera (Camera crew)

Foley
When a scene calls for additional sounds to add realism, or create a more realistic ambience for the video production, the Foley Artist introduces sounds for the particular sequence. (Sound)

Follow Focus
A Follow Focus is a device which controls the video camera focus ring, to enable pull-focus control of the camera, operated by the camera operator in situations such as corporate video production, or by an independent focus puller, such as in corporate video productions on film. The Follow Focus basically ensures that the appropriate action remains in focus. (Crew)

Footcandles
The footcandle is a measure of the amount of light, measured in lumens, within a square foot. Also known as Lumens per square foot. (Lighting)

Format
The format can refer to the absolute aspect ratio of a screen (for example 16:9, 4:3 etc (Distribution). It can also refer to the style of video production used by the corporate video production company in Manchester (Production), plus it can be used in edit or distribution to talk about the file format or media format, eg DVD is a format for media, mp4 is a file format. (Edit / Distribution)

FPS
FPS, or Frame Rate, is the number of frames in one second. Feature film generally uses 24 FPS, PAL 25 FPS and NTSC uses approximately 30 FPS. A ramping sequence used for slow-motion camera work can work with FPS rates of several thousand, which when slowed down provide a dramatic effect for corporate video production.

Frame
A frame has a number of meanings. In video production it is the smallest full part of a video sequence, and in film production refers to the actual ‘frame’ of the film. There are a number of frames in every second (minimum 24 to make up feature films or higher). A frame generally refers to moving images (for producing video) rather than sound where it is regarded as the audio contained within one second. The frame can also refer to whatever the director of photography decides should be ‘within the frame’. Anything inside the frame can be seen, outside the frame is not seen on screen. (Editing / Production / Crew)

Frame rate
This is the number of frames per second. Feature films commonly use 24 frames per second (fps). UK standards are 25fps and US standards are around 30fps. Higher frame rates can be used to achieve slow motion filming or for a ‘game-play’ style like 48fps feature films which lose their cinematic look.

Framing
Framing is the art of composing the shot, trying to balance and stylise what is visible in-frame. (Camera)

Freeze-frame
Using a single frame for more than one frame to ‘freeze’ the action (Editing)

French flag
A frech flag is a relocatable metal arm on the end of a camera to remove unwanted light from entering into the lens. Often used to avoid lens flare.

Fresnel
A stepped convex lens used for lighting units It is most commonly used to shape, enhance and focus tungsten-incandescent lamps. (Lighting)

# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
There are currently 32 names in this directory beginning with the letter F.
Fade
Used in every type of film production including corporate videos, a fade is the ‘fading in’ or ‘fading out’ slowly of a clip, at the beginning or end of a movie it is generally from black (or any colour) or to black (or any colour). During a corporate video a clip may be faded (or cross faded) to another gently, giving a smooth transition (Video editing)

FAST
Very simply, when a camera assistant is used in feature film or corporate video production, the term FAST means Focus; Aperture; Shutter; Tachometer – this is the domain of the camera assistant to check and adjust accordingly. (Crew)

Fast & slow lenses
The relative speed of a lens is a measure of the lens’ maximum aperture. The faster the lens, the more light crosses from outside the camera to behind the lens. Aperture is denoted as F Stop numbers, the lower the number, the quicker or ‘faster’ the lens (Crew).

FAY
A FAY is a 650W balanced daylight lamp (Lighting)

Feed Lines
Talent can be given off-screen or verbal cues to remind them of what their lines are .(Talent)

Fill Light
In video production, fill or a fill light is placed on the opposite side to the key (main) light. Fill light can be used to reduce contrast or simply fill areas where the light needs to be enhanced. (Lighting)

Film Production
Films and corporate video are produced by producers. The process of film production outlines the entire realm of services from initial scoping and project management, through to end-distribution. It includes the management of all video production services in between such as filming, scripting, and post production. (Production)

Film Production Company
A company (such as a film company or a corporate video production company) which provides video services or film services to clients for a range of productions. (Production)

Fingers
The tiny flags used in video production and film-making are called ‘Fingers’ in the video industry. (Lighting)

Fixer
A fixer is either a company or generally an individual who has extensive contacts within a particular country. For example if you are filming in a remote location or a country which has cultural or language differences, a fixer will have all the contacts to enable video productions to be completed without the need to visit the country to pre-arrange talent, locations, hire equipment, permissions etc. In corporate video production, a company for example in Manchester or London may wish to employ the services of an Australian fixer or a fixer from South Africa, if the company doesn’t have an office in the region itself. (Production)

Flag
In corporate video production companies a flag is a piece of dark material used to restrict light from being in the frame (Lighting / Grip).

Flat
This refers to either a set-design construction wall or a fixed-price fee, used by corporate video producers in Manchester or London video production companies. (Set design / Finance)

Flood
A type of light which has a very wide angle spread of beam is called a flood. They are different than spot lights or other forms of controlled lighting. (Lighting)

Flux
Light within an filming environment is measured in Flux or lumens. (Lighting)

Fly on the Wall
A style of video production, which can be reality TV, reality corporate video production or documentary-style, which gives a warts-and-all view of what is supposed to be reality. A good video production company London-based, such as thinktank can deliver results for corporate video fly-on-the-wall documentary or corporate video productions. They have become increasingly popular over the past decade in the UK. (Production / broadcast TV)

Foamcore
A plastic layer (foam /polystyrene) contained between paper-backed surfaces. Propriety examples include Foamex which can be used to deflect or reflect light sources. For more hardy materials, Forex, which is a more plasticated version of Foamcore can be used. This withstands more heavy duty use. (Grip/Lighting)

Focal Length
The technical definition of focal length is different to what film crew usually mean. Film crew use focal length to determine how narrow, wide or telescopic a lens will be. Lenses with a fixed focal length (eg 35mm) are called prime lenses. The Director or DoP will select a lens of a given focal length for a particular scene. The technical definition involves the distance between the glass optical lens and the video camera sensor. (Crew)

Focal Point
The Focal Point is used by video production companies to indicate the actual point or area which is the main focus for the frame. (Crew).

Focus Pull
A focus pull is when a subject or object is brought into focus, from an out of focus start point. The pull adjusts the distance from the camera which is in focus and a focus pull is used for shooting using a shallow depth of field. If lights or reflections can be seen, the out of focus start point may contain beautifully shaped ‘bokeh’ which sometimes looks like circles of light or shapes of light which change into a fully focused sharp image when focus is pulled. (Crew)

Focus Puller
The member of the camera department who works on larger productions to pull focus is called a focus puller. Focus pullers can use a variety of devices to pull focus, using the follow focus if required, or focus may be pulled electronically for some setups. (Crew)

Focus wheel
The focus wheel is used to alter focus on a camera (Camera crew)

Foley
When a scene calls for additional sounds to add realism, or create a more realistic ambience for the video production, the Foley Artist introduces sounds for the particular sequence. (Sound)

Follow Focus
A Follow Focus is a device which controls the video camera focus ring, to enable pull-focus control of the camera, operated by the camera operator in situations such as corporate video production, or by an independent focus puller, such as in corporate video productions on film. The Follow Focus basically ensures that the appropriate action remains in focus. (Crew)

Footcandles
The footcandle is a measure of the amount of light, measured in lumens, within a square foot. Also known as Lumens per square foot. (Lighting)

Format
The format can refer to the absolute aspect ratio of a screen (for example 16:9, 4:3 etc (Distribution). It can also refer to the style of video production used by the corporate video production company in Manchester (Production), plus it can be used in edit or distribution to talk about the file format or media format, eg DVD is a format for media, mp4 is a file format. (Edit / Distribution)

FPS
FPS, or Frame Rate, is the number of frames in one second. Feature film generally uses 24 FPS, PAL 25 FPS and NTSC uses approximately 30 FPS. A ramping sequence used for slow-motion camera work can work with FPS rates of several thousand, which when slowed down provide a dramatic effect for corporate video production.

Frame
A frame has a number of meanings. In video production it is the smallest full part of a video sequence, and in film production refers to the actual ‘frame’ of the film. There are a number of frames in every second (minimum 24 to make up feature films or higher). A frame generally refers to moving images (for producing video) rather than sound where it is regarded as the audio contained within one second. The frame can also refer to whatever the director of photography decides should be ‘within the frame’. Anything inside the frame can be seen, outside the frame is not seen on screen. (Editing / Production / Crew)

Frame rate
This is the number of frames per second. Feature films commonly use 24 frames per second (fps). UK standards are 25fps and US standards are around 30fps. Higher frame rates can be used to achieve slow motion filming or for a ‘game-play’ style like 48fps feature films which lose their cinematic look.

Framing
Framing is the art of composing the shot, trying to balance and stylise what is visible in-frame. (Camera)

Freeze-frame
Using a single frame for more than one frame to ‘freeze’ the action (Editing)

French flag
A frech flag is a relocatable metal arm on the end of a camera to remove unwanted light from entering into the lens. Often used to avoid lens flare.

Fresnel
A stepped convex lens used for lighting units It is most commonly used to shape, enhance and focus tungsten-incandescent lamps. (Lighting)